PhD Research Studentships in the School of Engineering and Innovation

Open University - Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Full time – 3 years to start in October 2018

Approximate stipend of £14,553, tuition fees are covered

Based in Milton Keynes

At the School of Engineering and Innovation we seek to attract and train exceptionally qualified and strongly motivated individuals to PhD Studentships in the following areas: Design, Materials Engineering, Waste Management, Energy and Acoustics.

Information on each research project can be found at the following link: 

http://www9.open.ac.uk/mct-ei/phd-studentships

Enquiries about each project should be directed to the lead supervisor.

Interested?

These are full-time 3 year studentships and you would be required to live in the UK, close to the university campus in Milton Keynes. For more information on the Open University’s application process, visit:

http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/how-to-apply/mphil-and-phd-application-process

Candidate Applications to include:

  • a 1000 word cover letter, outlining how you are equipped in educational background and expertise to conduct the research project
  • a CV including contact details for 3 academic references
  • an Open University application form, downloadable from the above link.
  • IELTs English Language test score (from SELT Secure English Language test centre) which must be dated within 2 years of the registration, October 2018 (not required for Home students).

Interviews will take place in early March 2018

Please send applications to the Research Administrator by e-mail: STEM-EI-Research@open.ac.uk

Equal Opportunity is University policy

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Advert information

Type / Role:

PhD

Location(s):

South East England