4 Fully Funded PhD Studentship Opportunities

University of Stirling - Faculty of Social Sciences

SGSSS-DTC/Skills Development Scotland PhD +3/1+3 Studentship

Transitions and Labour Market Outcomes for Ethnic Minority Young People in Scotland

Supervisors:  Dr Marina Shapira and Dr Dave Griffiths (both University of Stirling)

Closing Date: 30 April 2018 (5pm)

Applications are invited for a full-time PhD scholarship at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling. The scholarship is available to support either a 3-year research degree, or a 4-year programme incorporating a Masters course followed by 3-year research degree.

The PhD research will explore school-to-work transitions and labour market outcomes of BME young people in Scotland.

Ethnic diversity is growing in Scotland. Although, on average, educational attainment of school leavers from BME backgrounds surpasses that of their peers from white ethnic background, and  the former have higher rates of transitions into Higher Education than the latter,  this improvement has not been matched by a sustained improvement in labour market outcomes for young people from BME background. There is a growing evidence that choices made by young people at the secondary education phase are consequential for their post-school transitions, achievement and labour market outcomes. Yet the role of these choices on the post-secondary transitions and the labour market outcomes of BME young people in Scotland is under-explored.

The proposed doctoral research programme will use mixed research methods to investigate the factors associated with transitions from education to the labour market of BME young (16-25) people in Scotland.  

This will include

  • providing up-to-date and detailed evidence on trends in these transitions;
  • examining the subject choices made at different stages of secondary education and explore the determinants of these choices;
  • examining the transitions into higher education and explore the factors that  affect the decisions of  BME young people to apply to and their chances of being admitted to a certain type of universities/study programmes;
  • exploring how secondary school students from minority ethnic backgrounds make decisions about their subject and career choices.

The project will be informed by the analyses of large-scale administrative datasets such as Scottish Longitudinal Study dataset, the Scottish Government data on Transitions and Destinations of State School Leavers, the UCAS and the HESA datasets. In order to understand how secondary school students from minority ethnic background make decisions about the subject and career choices primary data will be gathered from ten schools across Scotland, with a range of ethnic diversity.

Hosted in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling, the PhD student will be ideally positioned to develop their skills in secondary data analysis and statistical analytical methodologies during the project. The student will be encouraged to develop and disseminate research outputs and will have opportunities to develop their professional skills such as with advanced training opportunities and chances to gain experience of academic activities including teaching opportunities. On completion the PhD programme the student should be extremely well placed to secure further academic and research positions. 

For full details please go to:-

https://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/social-science/transitions-and-labour-market-outcomes-for-ethnic-minority-young-people-in-scotland.html

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SGSSS-DTP  PhD +3/1+3 Studentship 

 “A Life Lived for Others”: Volunteering Participation and Transitions in Older Age

Supervised by: Dr Alasdair Rutherford & Professor Paul Lambert (both University of Stirling)

Closing date: 30th April 2018 (5pm)

Applications are invited for a full-time PhD scholarship at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling. The scholarship is available to support either a 3-year research degree, or a 4-year programme incorporating a Masters course followed by 3-year research degree.

The PhD research will involve analysing secondary social survey data drawn primarily from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).  It will involve developing valuable skills in accessing and working with data; data analysis; and longitudinal methods.

The project would ideally suit a graduate in social science, economics or other quantitative discipline who would like to develop and apply their skills in research that will have tangible implications for both policy and practice.

Hosted in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling, the PhD student will be ideally positioned to develop their skills in secondary data analysis and statistical analytical methodologies during the project, whilst concurrently engaging with experts in volunteering and social policy in Scotland. The student will be encouraged to develop and disseminate research outputs and will have opportunities to develop their professional skills such as with advanced training opportunities and chances to gain experience of academic activities including teaching opportunities The project’s research will be in a priority area of third sector policy attention and on completion the PhD programme the student should be extremely well placed to secure further academic and research positions. 

For full details please go to:-

https://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/social-science/a-life-lived-for-others-volunteering-participation-and-transitions-in-older-age-.html 

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SGSSS-DTC/Skills Development Scotland PhD +3/1+3 Studentship

Safe and Together? Exploring the implications of a risk paradigm for children and families in the context of domestic abuse

Supervisors: Prof Jane Callaghan & Dr Fiona Morrison (both University of Stirling)

Closing Date: 30th April 2018

Applications are invited for a full or part-time PhD scholarship at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling. The scholarship is available to support either a 3-year research degree , or a 4-year programme incorporating a Masters course followed by 3-year research degree or part time equivalent.

Domestic abuse services in the UK are increasingly dominated by a risk management paradigm (McLaughlin et al., 2016). Risk assessments categorise adult victims as high or low risk, and the services and protective mechanisms placed around families are premised on this categorisation. This focus on risk of physical violence can lead to insufficient attention paid to the wider needs of child and adult victims, failure to consider broader family dynamics (like coercive behaviour) and prioritisation of risk management over care. The Safe and Together model emerged to redress these difficulties, by equipping professionals with strategies to keep children living safely with their non-perpetrating parent. Although this model has been adopted widely in the UK, there is a very limited evidence base for the programme.

This research will interrogate how this model affects the pathways that children and families affected by domestic abuse follow. It will explore the service response to families who have experienced domestic violence and abuse by focusing on the services delivered by the City of Edinburgh Council. This local authority introduced Safe and Together in 2014. The project will analyse the pathways and outcomes that Safe and Together delivers for children and their families in this local authority area. Using a pluralistic qualitative design, the research will explore two central questions: “What are the implications of a risk paradigm for children and families in the context of domestic abuse?” and “How does Safe and Together contribute to addressing holistic needs of children and their families?”

Hosted in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling, the PhD student will be ideally positioned to develop advanced skills in qualitative research and research with vulnerable groups during the project, whilst concurrently engaging with experts in gender-based violence, social policy and social work. The research will be supervised by Professor Jane Callaghan and Dr Fiona Morrison at the Centre for Child Wellbeing and Protection.  The student will be encouraged to develop and disseminate research outputs and will have opportunities to develop their professional skills such as with advanced training opportunities and chances to gain experience of academic activities including teaching opportunities. The project’s research is a priority area of social policy and social work and on completion the PhD programme the student should be extremely well placed to secure further academic and research positions. 

For full details go to:-

https://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/social-science/safe-and-together-exploring-the-implications-of-a-risk-paradigm-for-children-and-families-in-the-context-of-domestic-abuse.html

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ESRC-SGSSS PhD studentship

Global Citizenship Mathematics Education: exploring controversial global issues through mathematics learning in Scottish schools.

Supervised by Dr Dalene Swanson and Dr Constantinos Xenofontos , it will be further supported by Ms Charlotte Dwyer and other colleagues at Scotdec

Closing Date:  24th May 2018 (5pm)

The Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling is seeking applicants for a full-time PhD studentship (1+3; +3) to begin in the 2018/2019 academic year. This studentship is part-funded by the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences (SGSSS), and the Scottish Development Education Centre, (Scotdec). The studentship provides full fees (at UK/EU rates), along with a living allowance and a training grant (at ESRC rates – see http://www.esrc.ac.uk/skills-and-careers/studentships/prospective-students/what-is-an-esrc-studentship-worth/). Applications from overseas candidates will be considered, with the caveat that the difference between home/EU and overseas will be deducted from the stipend (see http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/financial-information/tuition-fees/). The studentship is open to applicants with a Masters level qualification in a social science or related discipline, where the Master’s qualification contains a substantial component of core research skills training (or equivalent experience in using research methods).

The study will be supervised by University of Stirling academics:

Teachers’ perceptions of mathematics education are informed by their view of the nature of mathematics. The perception that mathematics is neutral and apolitical is dominant world-wide, informing teachers’ practices, including in Scotland. These attitudes may underpin teachers’ reluctance to consider the role that mathematics and mathematics education plays in issues of social and ecological justice in ‘global’ contexts. Bringing global citizenship education (GCE) to mathematics education is a teaching requirement of Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence.

For full details go to:-

https://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/social-science/global-citizenship-mathematics-education-exploring-controversial-global-issues-through-mathematics-learning-in-scottish-schools.html

For further information or to apply email socscipgr@stir.ac.uk

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Type / Role:

PhD

Location(s):

Scotland