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Research Associate in Immunology and Extracellular Matrix Biology (ImmunoMatrix)

The University of Manchester - Biology, Medicine and Health

Location: Manchester
Salary: £32,816 to £35,845 per annum, depending on relevant experience
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract
Placed On: 30th January 2020
Closes: 2nd March 2020
Job Ref: BM&H-15225
 

Division: Infection, Immunity & Respiratory Medicine

Contract Duration: for 2 years initially with scope for extension

Recruitment of leukocytes from the circulation to underlying tissues is a fundamental process that is critical to development and fighting infection. However, when this process goes wrong it is central to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis as well as atherosclerosis and cancer. 

Chemokines are the key regulators of leukocyte recruitment; they are presented on the endothelial surface where they bind to their receptors on circulating leukocytes. Chemokine interactions with their receptors lead to signalling events that enable movement of leukocytes from the circulation through the endothelium and into underlying tissues. The chemokine system collaborates with the extracellular matrix to drive leukocyte recruitment, but we are yet to successfully target chemokines during inflammatory disease.

This project is focused on understanding how the glycocalyx, an extracellular matrix barrier that lines blood vessels, collaborates with chemokines to regulate leukocyte recruitment. We have demonstrated that certain chemokines may function by directly modulating the glycocalyx barrier and not via the classical mechanism of signalling through chemokine receptors. We have also demonstrated that the biochemistry of the glycocalyx is tuned to produce interaction with, and localisation of, specific chemokines. This will build upon a series of recent papers demonstrating that the chemokine system is built upon specificity and not redundancy.

This project will utilise cutting edge multi-photon imaging in vivo to directly study the glycocalyx and dissect its role in regulating leukocyte recruitment at rest and during inflammation. A truly multi-disciplinary approach is taken within the newly established Dyer lab, incorporating biophysics, biochemistry and in vivo immunology. Ultimately this will lead to development of novel therapeutics to ameliorate inflammatory disease and cancer.

You will be responsible for driving forward an exciting and innovative package of work to directly image the glycocalyx and determine how it is regulated during inflammation to facilitate leukocyte recruitment. 

Successful candidates may be subject to pre-employment screening carried out on our behalf by a third party. The offer of employment will be dependent on the successful candidate passing that screening. Whilst you will be required to provide express consent at a later stage, by continuing with your application now you acknowledge that you are aware that such screening will take place, and agree to take part in the process.

Please note that we are unable to respond to enquiries, accept CVs or applications from Recruitment Agencies.

Enquiries about the vacancy, shortlisting and interviews:

Name: Dr Douglas Dyer

Email: douglas.dyer@manchester.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 275 1743

This vacancy will close for applications at midnight on the closing date.

Further particulars including job description and person specification are available on the University of Manchester website - click on the 'Apply' button above to find out more.

   
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